Ensemble for the Romantic Century presents a play involving the fusion of Emily Dickinson’s writings and music by Amy Beach entitled “Because I Could Not Stop: An Encounter with Emily Dickinson”

Ensemble for the Romantic Century presents a play involving the fusion of Emily Dickinson’s writings and music by Amy Beach entitled “Because I Could Not Stop: An Encounter with Emily Dickinson.”

Works by Amy Beach include her songs “Ah, Love but a Day,” “Chanson d’Amour” and “Stella viatoris” as well as excerpts/movements from her instrumental chamber works – Theme and Variations for Flute and String Quartet, Op.80, Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 150 and Piano Quintet in F-sharp minor, Op. 67!

September 15- October 21, 2018: Performances at The Pershing Square Signature Center 480 W 42nd St, New York, NY 10036

Emily Dickinson produced some of the most haunting and mysterious works of the 19th Century but she was one of the most elusive artistic personalities. In Dickinson’s self-imposed solitude, she constructs a world of images, sensations, and emotions ruled by the breadth of her imagination. Through a pairing of her words with the music of renowned composer Amy Beach, audiences embark on a journey through Dickinson’s soul and inner world.  For more info and tickets, please visit their website.

Enjoy reading about how music theory professor Dr. Sabrina Clarke makes a point to use musical examples written by Amy Beach and other women in her classroom to teach music theory concepts as well as inclusiveness!

Many music professors in the areas of theory, history, etc. strive to remain inclusive in their classrooms by using research and examples from diverse sources.  In this case, Dr. Sabrina Clarke makes a point to include musical examples written by women every Friday using her strategy #femalecomposerfridays!

According to Dr. Clarke:

Each semester I try to develop new strategies for consistent representation of diverse voices in my theory classes. These strategies get worked into my regular course plans, and hopefully are positive steps towards a more inclusive music theory experience…Emphasizing and re-emphasizing the problems of representation in music theory is essential not only as a starting point for change, but for students to understand the context and need for this change.

Enjoy reading more about her strategy and her use today of musical examples taken from Amy Beach’s Dancing Leaves, Op. 102, no. 2 to aid in her in-class interval identification lesson!